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  • THE WORKS OF JOHN OWEN


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    EDITED BY WILLIAM H. GOOLD VOLUME This Edition of THE WORKS OF JOHN OWEN first published by Johnstone & Hunter, 1850-53 CONTENTS OF VOLUME 13.

    THE DUTY OF PASTORS AND PEOPLE DISTINGUISHED.

    Preface, 1. — Of the administration of holy things among the patriarchs before the law,2. — Of the same among the Jews, and of the duty of that people distinct from their church officers, 3. — Containing a digression concerning the name of “priests” the right of Christians thereunto by their interest in the priesthood of Christ, with the presumption of any particularly appropriating it to themselves. 4. — Of the duty of God’s people in cases extraordinary concerning his worship,5. — Of the several ways of extraordinary calling to the teaching of others — The first way, 6. — What assurance men extrordinarily called can give to others that they are so called in the former way, 7. — The second way whereby a man be called extraordinarily, 8. — Of the liberty and duty of uncalled Christians in the exercise of divers acts of God’s worship, ESHCOL; A CLUSTER OF THE FRUIT OF CANAAN.

    PREFATORY NOTE BY THE EDITOR, To the Reader, Rules of walking in fellowship, with reference to the pastor or minister that watcheth for our souls, Rules to be observed by those who walk in fellowship and considered, to stir up their remembrance in things of mutual duty one towards another, OF SCHISM. 1. — Aggravations of the evil of schism, from the authority of the ancients — Their incompetency to determine in this case, instanced in the sayings of Austin and Jerome — The saying of Aristides — Judgment of the ancients subjected to disquisition — Some men’s advantage in charging others with schism — The actors’ part privileged — The Romanists’ interest herein — The charge of schism not to be despised — The iniquity of accusers justifies not the accused — Several persons charged with schism on several accounts — The design of this discourse in reference to them — Justification of differences unpleasant — Attempts for peace and reconciliation considered — Several persuasions hereabout, and endeavors of men to that end — Their issues, 2. — The nature of schism to be determined from Scripture only — This principle by some opposed — Necessity of abiding in it — Parity of reason allowed — Of the name of “schism” — Its constant use in Scripture — In things civil and religious — The whole doctrine of schism in the epistles to the Corinthians — The case of that church proposed to consideration —Schism entirely in one church; not in the separation of any from a church; nor in subtraction of obedience from governors — Of the second schism in the church of Corinth — Of Clement’s epistle — The state of the church of Corinth in those days: j jEcclhsi>a paroikou~sa Ko>rinqon — Pa>roikov , who; paroiki>a , what — Pa>rocov , “paroecia” — To whom the espitle of Clement was precisely written — Corinth not a metropolitical church — Allowance of what by parity of reason may be deduced from what is of schism affirmed — Things required to make a man guilty of schism — Arbitrary definitions of schism rejected — That of Austin considered; as also that of Basil — The common use and acceptation of it in these days — Separation from any church in its own nature not schism — Aggravations of the evil of schism ungrounded — The evil of it from its proper nature and consequences evinced — Inferences from the whole of this discourse — The church of Rome, if a church, the most schismatical church in the world — The church of Rome no church of Christ; a complete image of the empire — Final acquitment of Protestants from schism on the principle evinced, peculiarly of them of the late reformation in England — False notions of schism the ground of sin and disorder, 3. — Objections against the former discourse proposed to consideration — Separation from any church in the Scripture not called schism — Grounds of such separation; apostasy, irregular walking, sensuality — Of separation on the account of reformation — Of commands for separation — No example of churches departing from the communion of one another — Of the common notion of schism, and the use made of it — Schism a breach of union — The union instituted by Christ,4. — Several acceptations in the Scripture of the name “church” — Of the church catholic, properly so called — Of the church visible — Perpetuity of particular churches — A mistake rectified — The nature of the church catholic evinced — Bellarmine’s description of the church catholic — Union of the church catholic, wherein it consists — Union by way of consequence — Unity of faith, of love — The communion of the catholic churh in and with itself — The breach of the union of the church catholic, wherein it consisteth — Not morally possible — Protestants not guilty of it — The papal world out of interest in the church catholic — As partly profane — Miracles no evidence of holiness — Partly ignorant — Self-justiciaries — Idolatrous — Worshippers of the beast,5. — Of the catholic church visible — Of the nature thereof — In what sense the universality of professors is called a church — Amyraldus’ judgment in this business — The union of the church in this sense, wherein it consists — Not the same with the union of the church catholic, nor that of a particular instituted church — Not in relation to any one officer, or more, in subordination to one another — Such a subordination not provable — Ta< ajrcai~a of the Nicene synod — Of general councils — Union of the church visible not in a general council — The true unity of the universality of professors asserted — Things necessary to this union — Story of a martyr at Bagdad — The apostasy of churches from the unity of the faith — Testimony of Hegesippus vindicated — Papal apostasy — Protestants not guilty of the breach of this unity — The catholic church, in the sense insisted on, granted by the ancients — Not a political body, 6. — Romanists’ charge of schism on the account of separation from the church catholic proposed to consideration — The importance of this plea on both sides — The sum of their charge — The church of Rome not the church catholic; not a church in any sense — Of Antichrist in the temple — The catholic church, how intrusted with interpretation of Scripture — Of interpretation of Scripture by tradition — The interest of the Roman church herein discharged — All necessary truths believed by Protestants — No contrary principle by them manifested — Profane persons no members of the church catholic — Of the late Roman proselytes — Of the Donatists — Their business reported and case stated — The present state of things unsuited to that of old — Apostasy from the unity of the church catholic charged on the Romanists — Their claim to be that church sanguinary, false — Their plea to this purpose considered — The blasphemous management of their plea by some of late — The whole dissolved — Their inferences on their plea practically prodigious — Their apostasy proved by instances — Their grand argument in this case proposed; answered — Consequences of denying the Roman church to be a church of Christ weighed, 7. — Of a particular church; its nature — Frequently mentioned in Scripture — Particular congregations acknowledged the only churches of the first institution — What ensued on the multiplication of churches — Some things promised to clear the unity of the church in this sense — Every believer ordinarily obliged to join himself to some particular church — Many things in instituted worship answering a natural principle — Perpetuity of the church in this sense — True churches at first planted in England — How they ceased so to be — How churches may be again re-erected — Of the union of a particular church in itself — Foundation of that union twofold — The union itself — Of the communion of particular churches one with another — Our concernment in this union, 8. — Of the church of England — The charge of schism in the name thereof proposed and considered — Several considerations of the church of England — In what sense we were members of it — Of Anabaptism — The subjection due to bishops — Their power examined — Its original in this nation — Of the ministerial power of bishops — Its present continuance — Of the church of England, what it is — Its description — Form peculiar and constitutive — Answer to the charge of schism, on separation from it in its episcopal constitution — How and by what means it was taken away — Things necessary to the constitution of such a church proposed and offered to proof — The second way of constituting a national church considered — Principles agreed on and consented unto between the parties at variance on this account — Judgment of Amyraldus in this case — Inferences from the common principles before consented unto — The case of schism, in reference to a national church in the last sense, debated — Of particular churches, and separation from them — On what accounts justifiable — No necessity of joining to this or that — Separation from some so called, required — Of the church of Corinth — The duty of its members — Austin’s judgment of the practice of Elijah — The last objection waived — Inferences upon the whole, A REVIEW OF THE TRUE NATURE OF SCHISM.

    PREFATORY NOTE BY THE EDITOR, To the Reader, 1. — [General character of Mr Cawdrey’s book], 2. — An answer to the appendix of Mr Cawdrey’s charge, 3. — A review of the charger’s preface, 4. — Of the nature of schism,5. — [On the objections to Owen’s views of the nature of schism], 6. — [On schism in reference to the catholic invisible church], 7. — [On schism in reference to the catholic church visable], 8. — Of Independentism and Donatism, 9. — [On schism in reference to a particular church], 10. — Independency no schism, AN ANSWER TO A LATE TREATISE ABOUT THE NATURE OF SCHISM.

    PREFATORY NOTE BY THE EDITOR, An Answer, etc., A BRIEF VINDICATION OF THE NONCONFORMISTS FROM THE CHARGE OF SCHISM.

    PREFATORY NOTE BY THE EDITOR, A Brief Vindication, etc., TRUTH AND INNOCENCE VINDICATED, PREFATORY NOTE BY THE EDITOR, Review of the Preface, 1. — [Inconsistent expressions of Parker in regard to the power of the magistrate and the rights of conscience — The design of his discourse to prove the magistrate’s authority to govern the consciences of his subjects in affairs of religion — This doctrine inconsistent with British law — Ascribes more power to the magistrate than to Christ — Contrary to the history of the royal prerogative — Alleged necessity of the principle to public peace and order — Evils alleged to spring from liberty of conscience — The principle of Parker no real preventive to these evils — Various pleas refuted], 2. — [Alleged power of the magistrate over the conscience in matters of morality refuted — Distinction between moral virtue and grace — Meaning of the terms — Four propositions of Parker on grace and virtue considered — Agreement between the views of Parker and those of the Socinian Seidelius — Exceptions taken to these views — Power of the magistrate in references to moral duties — The true ground of obligation to these duties], 3. — [Liberty of conscience — The obligation to comply with its dictates not superseded by the authority of the magistrate — External worship an essential part of religion — External worship not left to be regulated by man — The right of sacrifice shown to be of divine original — Alleged right of the magistrate to appoint ceremonies — Distinction between words and ceremonies as signs], 4. — [Conscience exempted from human authority, where there is an antecedent obligation from divine authority], 5. — [Alleged evils from the free exercise of conscience — Charges of Parker against Noncomformists — Mischief of different sects in a commonwealth — Duties of a prince in reagrd to divided interests in religion — Principle of toleration asserted], 6. — [The word of God the sole rule of worship — The light of reason — Vocal revelation — Magistrate’s power in regard to things without the church but about it — Testimonies from the ancient fathers as to the supreme authority of Scripture — Alleged instances from the Old Testament of the magistrate appointing religious rites — Parker’s answers to certain objections considered — Doctrine of passive obedience refuted — Alleged right of the magistrate to punish his subjects if they will not comply with idolatry or supersition established by law — The true dignity and functions of the magistrate declared — Exhortation to toleration and charity], TWO QUESTIONS CONCERNING THE POWER OF THE SUPREME MAGISTRATE, ETC.

    PREFATORY NOTE BY THE EDITOR, Question First, Question Second, Question Third, INDULGENCE AND TOLERATION CONSIDERED.

    PREFATORY NOTE BY THE EDITOR.

    Indulgence and Toleration Considered, A PEACE-OFFERING.

    PREFATORY NOTE BY THE EDITOR, A Peace-Offering, etc., GROUNDS AND REASONS ON WHICH PROTESTANT DISSENTERS DESIRE THEIR LIBERTY.

    PREFATORY NOTE BY THE EDITOR, The Grounds and Reasons, etc., THE CASE OF PRESENT DISTRESSES ON NONCONFORMISTS EXAMINED.

    PREFATORY NOTE BY THE EDITOR, The Present Distresses, etc., STATE OF THE KINGDOM WITH RESPECT TO THE PRESENT BILL AGAINST CONVENTICLES.

    PREFATORY NOTE BY THE EDITOR The State of the Kingdom, etc., A WORD OF ADVICE TO THE CITIZENS OF LONDON.

    PREFATORY NOTE BY THE EDITOR, A Word of Advice, etc.,

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